Wilder – A FlexSchool Student Magazine

The first edition of Wilder – A FlexSchool Student Magazine is here! You may download the PDF here. Thank you to everyone who worked so hard to make this magazine happen! Our students never cease to amaze us!

Wilder - A FlexSchool Student Magazine
Some of the students involved in making the magazine.

Jacqui Byrne’s Tilt Parenting Interview

Recently, Jacqui sat down with our friend Debbie Reber, host of the wonderful Tilt Parenting podcast and author of Differently Wired both of which are phenomenal resources for parents of twice-exceptional children. In this podcast, you will hear Jacqui speak about why she began FlexSchool, why it is designed as a network of small schools, how our schools meet the unique needs of 2e learners, as well as how parents and communities can bring a FlexSchool campus to their area.

“I mean, I just have to say when I came down to check out the school and I walked in and I just loved every student immediately. It was like these are the cool, differently wired, awesome creative kids! It was just such a great vibe.” – Debbie Reber

Want to have better focus? Wake up and be active!

Ever since I was a kid, I tried to start my day with some sort of physical activity. That is, until three years ago, when I finished Grad School and became a Dad. I suddenly found myself with a different schedule and different priorities. Since then, I have found that I have far less energy than I used to, and it impacted virtually every aspect of my life.  Sure, it could be that I’m getting older, getting a LOT less sleep, but, what if this change to my daily routine had something to do with it? So, as any good scientist would, I decided to test this hypothesis.  I decided that I would force myself to do what I’ve always done, even if it meant getting EVEN less sleep.  So, with my alarm set for 4:45 a.m., I began my experiment.

The first week was tough, I am not going to lie. My body ached, I was cranky, and I was ready to hit the pillow the second I walked in the door from work. The second week was easier, I found myself gaining more energy and generally feeling more positive. By the third week, I found myself waking up a few minutes before the alarm and having more energy than I could remember in a long time. But, the most profound change I noticed was how focused and productive I was at work. As an Exercise Physiologist, I know the research, exercise has positive effects on mood… exercise impacts cognitive function…. blah, blah, blah. But, it wasn’t until I experienced the impact first-hand that it hit me. What a difference starting your day with a physical activity makes!

Then I started thinking why is it that schools don’t have physical education first thing in the morning?  Wouldn’t it be great for all students to start their day full of energy and ready to concentrate? As a good Scientist, here is where I give you the “facts and figures” in Geek Speak. There is well-established research demonstrating the positive effects of exercise and physical activity in the general population with regards to overall health and disease states. However, the research on the impact of exercise in the preadolescent and adolescent population and how it affects cognitive function is in its infancy. A review of current literature suggests that improvements in cardiorespiratory function have positive effects on mood and self-esteem and is positively associated with higher academic performance.1,2 A study specifically evaluating preadolescent students suggested that aerobic capacity was positively associated with academic performance; including total academic achievement, mathematic achievement and reading achievement.3 Several studies have delved further, examining effects of physical activity in the classroom setting with evidence supporting that single acute-bouts of moderately-intense aerobic exercise (e.g. walking) increases attention and academic performance.4,5 The benefits of exercise go beyond those seen in the general population when we look at the 2e population.  Recent studies have shown that students that have ADD/ADHD perform better in the classroom throughout the day due to the release of dopamine during exercise.6 Furthermore, research has shown that a single bout of moderate exercise can increase executive functioning immediately afterwards, and with continued stimulation can have a long last effect.7 Pretty cool, huh?

So, what does that mean?  It means that motion stimulates creativity, improves student well-being, and fosters academic stamina.  To me, those results sound like the frame work of a good Mission Statement for any up and coming school, no? That’s why I firmly believe that starting every day at FlexSchool with physical activity is important to my students’ health and academic performance. I devote the first period of the day to Wellness, to allow each of my students to “rev up” or “supercharge” their brains for the day.  Whether or not everyone of my students will experience the benefits observed in the “research” is arguable. However, do I care enough about my students to give them every opportunity to thrive? ABSOLUTELY.

Jesse teaches science and physical education for FlexSchool New Haven.

References

  1. Ortega, F., Ruiz, J., Castillo, M., Sjostrom, M., Physical fitness in childhood and adolescence: a powerful marker of health. International Journal of Obesity, 2008; v32: 1–11.
  2. Singh, A., Uijtdewilligen, L., Twisk, J., van Mechelen, W., Chinapaw, M., Physical Activity and Performance at School.  Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(1):49-55
  3. Castelli, D., Hillman, C., Buck, S., Erwin, H., Physical Fitness and Academic Achievement in Third- and Fifth-Grade Students. JSEP, 2007; V29(2): 239-252.
  4. Hillman, C.,Pontifex, M., Raine,L., Castelli, D., Hall, E.,Kramer, A., The effect of acute treadmill walking on cognitive control and academic achievement in preadolescent children. Neuroscience, 2009; v159(3),1044-1054.
  5. Donnelly, J., Lambourne, K., Classroom-based physical activity, cognition, and academic achievement. Prev Med. 2011; v2:S36-S42
  6. Guiney, H., Machado, L., Benefits of regular aerobic exercise for executive functioning in healthy populations. Psychon Bull Rev, 2013; v20:73-86.
  7. Xiang, Q., Yih Xian Ho, C., Wuen Chan, H., Zheng Jie Yong, B.,Wee-Song, W. Managing childhood and adolescent attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with exercise: A systematic review. Complementary Therapies in Medicine,2017; v20:123-128.

Terrific Teacher Tuesday at FlexSchool

Today we meet Margaret Sport, an adventurer, a learner, as well as a teacher of Bioethics, Chemistry, Algebra, Geometry, Anatomy & Physiology, and Earth Science. Margaret blazed her own trail in while studying at Colorado College and designed her major in Bioethics with a minor in music. Did you know she began playing piano at Wharton School of Music, the same music school our Berkeley Heights campus housed with while our new school was completed? Sometimes takes you full circle.

What is your favorite part of teaching at FlexSchool?
My favorite part about teaching at FlexSchool is definitely the people. I am surrounded by amazing individuals each and every day. The staff and faculty have taught me so much in the months I have been working here. The kids make me laugh and smile till my cheeks hurt. It has been a joy to see them grow and to see myself grow with them.

What are you reading and/or learning right now?
I just finished reading both The Song of Achilles and Circe by Madeline Miller. My favorite class in college was a five-week course abroad in Greece entitled The World of Odysseus: History and Myth. We sailed the Greek islands, retracing Odysseus’s path home from the Trojan War. At the time, I couldn’t believe it was a real class, but I learned so much! Miller’s books tell the story of the Iliad and Odyssey from the perspectives of minor characters, Patroclus and Circe respectively. It was so fun to revisit the characters and myths from a new angle and learn more information about them. Circe, for example, was not only involved in the Odyssey but also experienced the tales of Jason and the Argonauts, King Minos and the Minotaur, Daedalus and Icarus. I would recommend them to anyone. The depth of research and rich storytelling combine to pull you in page after page, whether you’ve read the Homeric epics or not.

I love hiking, biking, skiing, surfing, backpacking, or anything to do outside. I just got back from a three-week trip traveling through the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. I also play classical piano – I continued my music studies during my undergraduate studies.

Another large part of my life is volunteering. I have been a volunteer EMT on the Mountainside Rescue Squad for six years. I also was a founding member of my college’s student-run Emergency Medical Service. I love being able to give back to my community and am glad to be able to help people in their times of need.

My final passion is travel. I have been very fortunate to study abroad three times – in Greece, Spain, and Thailand. I am trying to keep my country count up to my age, but am currently behind with only 21 countries. I am planning a trip to China, Taiwan, and Vietnam over winter break to see a friend who works for the State Department, so hopefully, I will catch up for my 24th birthday. I truly believe exposure to a variety of peoples, cultures, languages, and beliefs promotes tolerance, understanding, and peace.